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20121229
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
. he also reminds us of our history. there has been no civil rights or human rights movement in which the faith communities and its leaders have not been at the forefront and i look at dr. and he is a living reminder of that truth. at the heart of civil rights movement in the years 1963 and 1964 before there was a san francisco interface council there was the san francisco conference on religion, race and social concerns which for 25 years was the voice of social justice in the city and county of san francisco. it was that movement that gave birth to the san francisco interfaith council whose mission it is to bring people together of different faiths, to celebrate our diverse spiritual and religious traditions, build understanding, and serve our city. it was a previous mayor that challenged the interface council to step up to the place, to respond to its moral responsibility to care for the homeless at a time of crisis spun out of control, and we did. for almost a quarter of a century we have opened our congregation doors, fed and provided a warm and safe place for homeless men to
are not hatch in three days. it would take three long weeks for those eggs to hatch. the civil rights movement taught me patience. never give up, never to give in, to never give up, but to always keep your eyes on the prize. so across the bridge is about patients, about how, truth, love and reconciliation. now when i was growing up in rural alabama and was visiting a town of troy, visiting montgomery, visited tuskegee and later as a student in nashville, tennessee and made a living in atlanta. i saw the sign said white men, colored women, colored rating, white waiting. as a child my mother, father, grandparents said that's the way it is. don't get in the way, don't get in trouble. but in 1855 at the age of 15, i heard of rosa parks. i heard of martin luther king junior. in 1957 at the age of 17 i never said parks. the next year at the age of 18, i meant to her martin luther king junior. the action of rosa parks, people in my camera and leadership of dr. king inspired me to get in the way, to get in trouble. for more than 50 years have been getting in trouble, good chabot, necessary travel. [ap
that we see in -- acrimony. it took us a long time to do the right thing in civil rights legislation. but we are seeing the perfection if i could use that term of the ways in which the two pears have become polarized in ways that overlap ideology, region and partisan and so the walls are getting thicker and thicker. and buzz of that it trickles down to the state level. and the gerrymandering that we see that reinforces the strength of people in particular pockets in the country means that most members now fear a primary challenge more than they fear a general election challenge and that gives all the incentives for ideolo gs to push -- gwen: is it fair to say that either side is being more intrasigent? >> yes, because they're a more ideological party. the block of conservatives is more than the block of liberals. the competition within the republican party has a higher of purity than democrats do. 60% of the votes that mitt romney got in 2012 were from people who call themselves conservatives. only 42% of the votes the president got where from people who call themselves liberal. a mo
? where did it come from? >> guest: probably having parents that were civil rights activists in the '60s in the bay area. that was probably my initial interest. i saw their activism, and that was important. but also, i think i became interested in international affairs at spelman, in particular for s--from some courses that i took, and then harvard was a wonderful place to study international relations. the end of the cold war story became important to me later on in my graduate career when i took a job, to the dismay of my dissertation adviser, to do the research for george shultz's memoir and--out at stanford. c-span: why--why to the dismay? >> guest: oh, because it was such a huge project for some--someone who was working on her own dissertation, to take on another project, and--but i thought it was a great opportunity. c-span: how did that happen? >> guest: in 1989, i moved out to california to work with condi rice, who was my outside reader on my thesis committee, partly, and also to be in the bay area, and she got a job in the bush at the first bush administration, and so i just ha
dispute. an abrupt end to the career of one long term maryland civil- rights leader. carl snowden will retire january 8. the office of the announcement earlier today. the decision comes amid legal problems. he was convicted last month of marijuana possession and has a court date for violating his probation in a drunk driving case. tonight was a reversal of fortune for morgan state university's president. the board of regents voted to renew his contract, weeks after voting not to. >> president wilson was diplomatic when i inquired about what led up to this controversy and why it suddenly ended in his favor, instead of pointing the finger at his critics, he took the high road. surely after the vote, dr. david wilson told us he is honored more as the university's board of regents minya their confidence in him and by extending his contract to june 2014. the decision comes a few weeks after the board decided to oust him as the president. >> a situation he blames himself for. >> the bucket stopped in the president's office. whatever transpired here, i will be the first one to raise my h
a program called, who is the dean of the civil rights movement, dean of black leadership, who at the whole idea about the march on washington almost 50 years ago would say from time to time, maybe our foremothers and forefathers thought came to this great land in different shapes. but we all in the same boat now. so it doesn't matter whether we are black or white, latino, asian american or native american. it doesn't matter whether a democrat or republicans. it doesn't matter whether we are straight. it does another whether jewish or not psalm, christians, we are one people. we are one family. we are one house spirit that's what the struggle been about. [applause] this book, "across that bridge" is saying in effect they struggle is a struggle to retain the soul of america. it's not a struggled the last one day, one week, one month, one year for one lifetime. maybe we take more than one lifetime to create a more perfect union. to create the beloved community. the community at peace with itself. now you heard david tell you that i did get arrested a few times. and young people coming out chi
, director of civil rights for the maryland attorney general's office, will retire on january 8th. the ag's office made that announcement friday. this decision comes amid some legal problems for snoweden. he was convicted last month of marijuana possession and has a court date last night. >>> one minute he's out, the next he's back in. the roller coaster ride for morgan state university's president david wilson appears to be over. yesterday the board voted to renew his contract. george lettuce has more. >> david wilson told us he is honored morgan state board of regents renewed his confidence by extending his contract to june 2014. friday's decision comes just a few weeks after the board voted to oust him as president, a situation he blames himself for. >> i'm the president of the institution. and so, as president, the buck stops in the president's office. and so certainly whatever transpired here, i'll be the first one to raise my hand to say i own it. >> he promises to improve relations and communication between his office and board members. >> i'll make sure the board is involved and t
correctness or what. >> a sense of a person's civil rights. >> a lack of awareness. we're teaching men the way to
steps have been take ton resolve the dispute. >>> the end of a career of one long time civil rights leader. carl snoweden will retire january 8th. the office made the announcement friday. this decision comes against some legal problems for snoweden. he was convicted last month of marijuana possession and has a court date next month for violating his probation in a drunk driving case. >>> one minute he's out, the next he's back in. that roller coaster ride for morgan state university president david wilson appears to be over. yesterday the board agreed to renew his contract. >> shortly after the vote, dr. david wilson told us he is honored morgan state university's board renewed their confidence in him by extending his contract to june 2014. friday's decision comes a few weeks after the board voted to oust him as president, a situation he blames himself for. >> i'm the president of the institution, and so as president, you know, the buck stops in the president's office. and so certainly whatever transpired here, i'll be the first one to raise my hand and say, i'll own it. >> he promi
look at the civil rights movement, that started with emmittville, montgomery. montgomery was supposed to be a boycott. people on the ground who begin to drive this issue. the conversation can't start in washington. washington is an aftereffect. it has to start with the people in various places driving them to move. if that doesn't happen, they will not move. >> you're absolutely right. that is the history of movements in america. but there is going to be a bill we know senator dianne feinstein is going to introduce a bill on the first day of the new congress. why shouldn't more folks get behind that, including some republicans? because i'd like to remind you of one thing. justice scalia said in the heller decision, like most rights the second amendment is not unlighted. -- not unlimited. he said, it is not a right to keep and carry any weapon whatsoever in any manner whatsoever for whatever purpose. from the high priest of the supreme court of conservatism himself. why doesn't that create some room for current conservatives like ronald reagan did in 1994 to back an assault weapons ban
, a civil rights attorney and law professor in my hometown, cleveland, and richard herman, a new york criminal defense attorney and law professor who joins us from las vegas. hello, happy holidays to both of you. >> same to you, marty. all the best. >> you, too. >> let's talk first jerry sandusky. a few things to bring up here. as we all remember, he was the penn state assistant football coach convicted in june on 45 counts of child sex abuse. he's now serving 30 to 60 years in prison. jerry sandusky says that he has now focused or he is focused on his appeal. he's got a hearing that i believe is set for january 10th on his pretrial motions. guys, there's a newspaper in northeastern pennsylvania that says sandusky sent a handwritten note saying he is trying to endure, and there was a lot more to it than that, but i'll leave it at that, and learn from his circumstances but had this to say about his trial -- nobody who covered the case or reported it had the time or took the time study the allegations, the accusere accuserers, the inconsistent, and the method. justice and fairness were
on campus led to his initial ousting. >>> a rough end to the career of a maryland civil rights pioneer tp the director of civil rights for the maryland attorney general's office will retire january 8th. the ag's office made that announcement friday. the decision comes amid some legal problems for snowden. he was convicted last month of marijuana possession and has a court date next month for violating his probation in a drufrn driving case. >>> the man brutally beaten on christmas day believes he was the victim of a hate crime. according to a police report, 30-year-old kenny shaw had just left the liquor store at east hoffman and milton streets. he was only a block away when a group of five or six men surrounded him. additional blows followed. he also tells 11 news that he was taunted weeks ago and he thinks he was targeted this time. >> i feel like it was a hate crime because i am homosexual. like i said, i do stand out. >> police are now investigating this case and detectives say they have some good leads in what they are now calling an assault at this point. we're back in jus >> well,
which has put the economic question front and center. unlike the civil-rights and feminists and many other important movements of our time where there was fear of going in that direction, they were not ready for it, the police would be angry and arrest of a. this is a movement that's that we are putting the question of the 1% and 99% front and center. that opens a space that this book is not doable without the space opened by occupy wall street or the interests. if i am correct in understanding this, its third printing and it only appeared in may of this year, the thanks go to the people like the occupy wall street people who are willing to break from the tradition not to be limited by the end dumb ~ either/or republican and democrat and are willing to push in another direction. >> another question on the occupy movement, what has happened to it? it seems to have gone into some sort recess for stasis. >> a great political leader of the left whose name i won't mention because it frightens people is well known for having said political movements do not develop in a straight line. it do
? - i said get! - all right, i'm getting. no use getting mad about it. keep a civil tongue in your head. that's no way to talk to an old man. huh. [suspenseful music] ♪ - don't shoot. please, mister. - there was an old prospector in your store today. - i didn't tell him anything, so help me. - why not? - well, i--i don't know anything. - you don't know who killed pete ramirez? - no, i don't. - you sure? - i don't know who killed him. - then what could you have told that old prospector but didn't? [gun cocks] - all right. about the dynamite. - dynamite? - there. you got it out of me. cassidy sent you to find out if you could. tell him i never asked to handle the gol-darn stuff. mr. kilgore ordered it. why can't he order things like that right there in his own town, right there in brasada? what's all the big secret about? [dramatic music] ♪ [drumming] ♪ - tonto, those drums are summoning the tribes to war. - that plenty bad, kemo sabay. ranchers talk war all time. indians make ready. soon war start, and they fight, fight. - not if we can stop them. - spirit mountain talk, kemo sabay
in a military environment go in with the right knowledge and the right attitude and you can see the tactical unit at the bottom there and the crisis response civil military operations center that was there to provide the command and control of those tactical units responding on the military side, this provided a perfect environment and opportunity for them to be able to interact with the civilian partners and provide the most appropriate response and understanding. very complex and again i just want to reiterate that the military, we know when we're responding in this type of environment that we're not coming in with the heavy capability and saying don't worry, we're here to help you and take over, we're here to complement and support you with the appropriate ways that you request our needs. the next few slides that i'm going to go over here shows some of the military capability and how some of those responses that we did during this exercise can also be applied at home in a domestic environment such as a response to maybe an earthquake here in san francisco. so the first part up there, you
. the state department says it regrets this decision along with russia's new restrictions on civil society organizations that work with mile-per-hour partners. the adoption law is really believed -- american partners. the adoption law is really believed is in some way linked to other human rights violators from traveling to the states and freezes their assets. some say you can't link the two laws. translator: i think this law is absolutely outrageous and despicable. this is a law that punishes russian children for $230 million stolen by russian bureaucrats. >> reporter: this boy is the son of a woman with disabilities in russia and the american family that is about to finalize an adoption with him may be his last chance for a home. >> now in our son's case 22 families, russian families, came to see him and rejected him because of his bloodline. >> reporter: there are dozens of russian children already in the final stages of the process of adoption by american families, many of whom have already jumped through several hoops to prove to the russians that they are fit parents. the u.s. gov
and this history of "jet" and you know, but we want to know what she likes to walk on the beach, right. >> listen -- >> is this a turning point to get back to the civil rigthts history? >> well, you know, i think that it is definitely a turning point. we are definitely trying to do more to balance the enterta entertainment, and the important news reporting. we have been doing that ever since i started about two yeas s ago, we have been working to find the delicate balance and making sure that we are informing with current news and things that are relevant to the community and providing the service. because that is what is so important about jet. they don't just inform, but they let others know how to use the information. that is another reason that jordan is on the cover, because like i said, we need to be active about this situation. we need to be active about jordan and be active about this l law, and be active about gun control and stay in motion. >> and mitzi, i want to come out of the table for a little bit, because farai, i want to ask you about "jet's" role and this moment, there is a lot
and thank you even for being your civil rights attorney and you are still representing people in need and i appreciate that. i know angela represents again the kind of contributions the italian community has made to our great city and continues to make and i am here to tonight to wish you a great year of italian culture but to kick start it. it was really just a few months ago that the ambassador ofity italy came through and talk about this wonderful thing they were to do to celebrate year of italian culture but transfer that to our country of the united states so i know they're going to start those events in washington dc with their celebrations but let us san francisco celebrate -- mayor aleato and our wonderful history here and allow us to do a preliminary launch and so that's what we're attempting to do tonight and celebrate with you this launch of italian culture. it's very meaningful for us to did that year. we have a lot to celebrate. let me just say that painters, scrptdures, poets, musicians, designers, mathematicians, great architects of the italian country have come here to sa
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)